Meet the Author – Fiona Barton

THE WIDOW                      THE CHILD      

        5/5 STARS                              4/5 STARS       

MY THOUGHTS:

I remember picking up a copy of The Widow on a cold, but sunny December morning last year in Chapters, and reading the synopsis. The story immediately spoke to me and I knew I had to get the book. As I sat down later on that night and indulged into the novel… I.Could.Not.Put.It.Down. Chapter after chapter, page after page, every character was creepier and more interesting. I was so immersed into the world of Jean Taylor, that I completely forgot my own. I loved Barton’s writing, and as I finished the novel, I honestly was craving MORE. Jean Taylor’s husband was fascinating to me – and Jean just as equally intriguing. 

Then, Fiona Barton released The Child in June 2017, and I was ecstatic! I picked up the book right away, and again, sat down and kept on reading – chapter after chapter, page after page. Every character within the novel was interesting, and I honestly had no idea how the story would even end. The way Barton writes allows you to completely immerse yourself into the lives of her characters, and imagine what you would do in their scenarios. Her second novel absolutely did not disappoint, and I am looking forward to reading more of Barton’s writing.

I am a huge fan of thrillers/mysteries, especially with female heroines & protagonists, and Barton’s novels definitely do not disappoint my cravings. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Fiona Barton has definitely become one of my favourite authors. Before writing her first novel, The Widow, Barton was a senior writer at the Daily Mail, and even won Reporter of the Year at the British Press Awards. Her writing flows, and her characters have such depth, and her writing gives you the ability to go inside her characters’ minds.

Luckily, she agreed to do a little Q&A with me!

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THE INTERVIEW:

Who’s your favourite author?

It seems to change from year to year – and sometimes day to day as I discover new writers but constants are authors who take risks to tell stories in new ways. Kate Atkinson and Hilary Mantel are particularly inspirational. Mantel (Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies) for the brilliance and vividness of her story-telling. She broke so many rules – and was criticized by some – but I was in her world from page one; Atkinson (When Will There Be Good News? And Life After Life) for her characters and showing me the power of a story told by many; and John Irving (Cider House Rules and A Prayer for Owen Meany) for his sheer, bonkers, otherness.

Favourite book or genre to read?

Reading is my passion so I read widely and enjoy all kinds of fiction – literary, historical, crime, thrillers, kitchen dramas, short stories, epics, trilogies, romans fleuves – you name it. The book I wish I had written is Wolf Hall.

Has your writing progress changed at all after writing The Widow?

Hugely. I felt huge pressure starting my second book. The success of The Widow meant there were expectations for number two and a deadline from the first word, creating a completely different writing experience. For the first one, no one knew I was writing it so I could let it cook in my head, move sentences around a hundred times and leave it for weeks on end. But Book 2 was a whole other story (in every sense…). What I have learned from both experiences is not to rush to put words on the page – thinking time is as important.

Where do you draw your inspiration from for your novels?

The people on the edge of a story, just out of the spotlight, have been my inspiration. They have a sort of invisibility that I find draws me into their world. I want to know what happens when the press pack leaves and the world stops watching. Because without witnesses or the distraction of the media scrum, masks cannot help but slip.

You were previously a reporter and a news editor. Would you say that being a reporter inspired you to become a writer?

To be honest, I had to unlearn an awful lot when I changed from reporter to fiction writer – you can’t put the whole story in the first paragraph in a thriller! But what I have kept from my journalism is a nose for a good story, and the wonderful cast of characters I amassed during those years.

For 30 years, I was watching and listening to people caught up in dramas, tragedies and conflicts. I squirreled away characters, snippets of conversations, encounters and when I came to write the book, they were all there, ready.

When I read The Widow last year, I was so stunned at the complexity of the characters. As a reader, you’re geared towards hating the husband… but I found Jean Taylor the most perplexing. Where did you get your ideas for this couple?

As a journalist, I spent a lot of time in court. In the big cases, I would find myself watching the wives of those accused of notorious and terrible crimes and wondering what they really knew – or allowed themselves to know. 

I wanted to know how do you cope with the idea that your husband – the man you chose to spend the rest of your life with – may be a monster? Jean and Glen grew out of that fascination and took me on an unexpected journey.

Do you plan on writing another novel any time soon?

I am deep into book 3 now. Watch this space…

Would you like to see either (or both?) of your novels adapted to the big screen?

Both The Widow and The Child have been optioned for television – very excited but not counting my chickens…

Any advice for young aspiring writers out there?

Two pieces of advice stick out: Writing is not just about putting words on a page. Ideas have to cook first. And: hold your nose and write (thank you Hallie Ephron!)

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Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me, Fiona! Looking forward to your next book!

Stay up to date with Barton’s latest project at her website: http://fionabartonauthor.com

Until next time bookies,

Sam

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