Book Review & Meet The Author – THE WINTERS by Lisa Gabriele

THE WINTERS

RWS RATING: 4/5 STARS

RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 16TH 2018

thewinters 

SYNOPSIS

A spellbindingly suspenseful new novel set in the moneyed world of the Hamptons, about secrets that refuse to remain buried and consequences that can’t be escaped

After a whirlwind romance, a young woman returns to the opulent, secluded Long Island mansion of her new fiancé Max Winter—a wealthy politician and recent widower—and a life of luxury she’s never known. But all is not as it appears at the Asherley estate. The house is steeped in the memory of Max’s beautiful first wife Rebekah, who haunts the young woman’s imagination and feeds her uncertainties, while his very alive teenage daughter Dani makes her life a living hell. She soon realizes there is no clear place for her in this twisted little family: Max and Dani circle each other like cats, a dynamic that both repels and fascinates her, and he harbors political ambitions with which he will allow no woman—alive or dead—to interfere.

As the soon-to-be second Mrs. Winter grows more in love with Max, and more afraid of Dani, she is drawn deeper into the family’s dark secrets—the kind of secrets that could kill her, too. The Winters is a riveting story about what happens when a family’s ghosts resurface and threaten to upend everything. (Goodreads.com)

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First off, when I received this book from Penguin RandomHouse Canada, I fell in love with the cover!! (Yes, Guardian, I am going to comment on the beautiful cover because book covers are a perfect, artistic representation for both the author and the story, so tough luck). So, don’t be fooled by the beautiful cover of this book… because the story within is mysterious, obscure, and curious.

I opened up the book, read the first chapter, and was hooked

It starts off with the description of Mr. Winters, his castle, and his relationship with the protagonist. Then, it dives into the history of their relationship, and finally brings us to the present – the protagonist and Mr. Winters move into the Asherley Estate, and the protagonist meets his daughter – Dani Winters. Some creepy events take place, and the protagonist endures the bullying from her step daughter. This book had major Jane Eyre vibes. For those of you that don’t know, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is my favourite book, and I actually studied the book for a whole semester! After reading Jane Eyre, I read and studied Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys.

This book is a feminist and anti-colonial response to Jane Eyre. It describes Mr. Rochester’s marriage from the point of view of his mad wife, Antoinette Cosway. Antoinette is Rhys’ version of Bronte’s devilish madwoman in the atticAntoinette’s story is told from the time of her youth in Jamaica, to her unhappy marriage to a certain unnamed English gentleman, who renames her Bertha, declares her mad, and then takes her to England. Antoinette is caught in an oppressive patriarchal society in which she neither fully belongs to Europe nor Jamaica. Wide Sargasso Sea explores the power relationships between men and women and develops postcolonial themes, such as racism, displacement and assimilation. (Goodreads.com)

So, the reason why I bring this up is because The Winters is so alike to both of these beloved novels/stories: a strange estate, an independent woman who fell in love, an odd, rich gentleman with a secret past, and an eerie setting.

As I continued to read the story, the events taking place were getting spookier, stranger, and overall interesting. The most interesting part of the book, is that as a reader, we never find out the protagonist’s name. Through dialogue, description, thought process, her name is never spoken. I loved this part about the book because it added so much more mystery to the entire story. 

After reading this book, I was so lucky to have the author, Lisa Gabriele, come on RWS to answer a few questions! Check it out:

 

Who’s your favourite author?

I have to say Daphne du Maurier, and not just because my book, The
Winters, is inspired by her best known novel, Rebecca, but because of
the sheer range of her work. She has written speculative fiction,
historical fiction, suspense, horror, romance, essays and biography. But
there’s a through line and it’s her impeccable language and surprising
plots. She’s a damn great storyteller.

Favourite book or genre to read?

I have a new favourite book all the time. Right now it’s Less, by Andrew
Sean Greer, tied with Daisy Jones and the Six, by Taylor Jenkins Reid,
which you’ll be hearing a lot about before its publication in March, 2019.
I tore through both books recently, and they left me breathless and
excited about the possibilities of writing meaningful fiction that has
wide commercial appeal.

When was the moment you realized that you loved literature?

I say this all the time but I am a far more passionate and talented reader
than writer. I love writing, but I fell in love with literature as a reader
first, devouring them once I learned how to read, and I’ve never
stopped.

What made you want to be a writer?

It was such a natural progression, I don’t ever remember not writing.
Since I was eight years old it’s been a compulsion. I have filled
notebooks with short stories and have written in diaries well before I
ever published a thing. What truly makes me a writer is an inherent
need to work something out on paper, usually through made up people.
Or to bring to life the stories that seem to float in the ether around me.
Writing is also a form of entertaining myself, something I have always
enjoyed doing.

What inspired you to write your latest book, The Winters? While
I was reading it, I got MAJOR Jane Eyre vibes!

Funny you should say that. My book is a response to du Maurier’s Rebecca,
which itself was a response to Jane Eyre. My mother was the one who
introduced me to Alfred Hitchcock’s movie version of Rebecca first, and whenever I miss her I reach for it. In the fall of 2016, in the despairing days of the U.S. election, I bought some ice cream and threw in the DVD to drown out the bad news. But this time, instead of comforted, it left me feeling deeply uneasy. I had to remind myself that in Daphne du Maurier’s book Maxim de Winter killed his sexually rebellious first wife, a fact that Hitchcock, due to Production Codes at the time, erased. I suddenly felt this strong desire to avenge Rebecca and punish Maxim. So I guess you could say nostalgia inspired me to reread the book, but anger drove me to write mine.
I found it interesting that we never know the protagonist’s name in the book…what’s the reason? 

This was a trope I borrowed from Rebecca, which also has an unnamed narrator, mostly just to see if I could do it, write a book with a nameless narrator. Needless to say it was much harder than I thought it would be.

Did your writing process change at all when you began writing
more books?

Luckily, I have always been disciplined. I get up in the morning and have
breakfast and then just start writing. I write for four to six hours and
then take a nap. Then I try to exercise before supper. I keep my schedule
light when I’m writing, so I don’t break a mood. The thing that helps me
the most is having a deadline.

Can we expect any more books from you coming up?

Yes, I’m laying the tracks for my next book now, which I think will be in
the same suspenseful vein as The Winters, this one about an older
women, newly sober, who helps out a younger one, who may not be who
she says she is.

Do you have any advice for young writers out there?
Read like crazy, read everything. When you’re not writing, you must be
reading. And if you’re not reading, you must be writing.

 

Thank you Lisa, for coming on RWS to chat!

Gabriele’s novel The Winters, will be available in stores OCTOBER 16th 2018!

You can also visit her website: www.lisagabriele.com

MEET THE AUTHOR – Sonia Faruqi

THE OYSTER THIEF

RWS RATING: 3.5/5 STARS

RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 2ND 2018

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SYNOPSIS

“It took her a journey across the ocean to learn what she knew of love and fear and hate, but the essence of it came to her in an instant, as she succumbed to the churning black depths of the deep sea.”

Coralline is a shy mermaid in the Atlantic Ocean whose idyllic life is ruined by an oil spill that gravely sickens her little brother. Desperate to save him, she embarks on a quest to find a legendary elixir.

She encounters a human man, Izar, who’s left his life on land behind to find a cure for his dying father. He doesn’t tell her that his family runs Ocean Dominion, an enemy corporation whose ships plunder her waters daily.

Fate pushes the two of them together, even though their worlds are at odds. Accompanied by a colorful troupe of animals, Coralline and Izar travel through coral reefs and seabed cities, trailed by murderous adversaries and warring ships. Their secrets threaten to tear them apart, while a growing attraction adds to the danger. Ultimately, each of them faces an impossible choice. Should Coralline remain with the world she knows, including her fiancé, or should she relinquish everything for a stranger who might betray her? And Izar holds a secret of his own—one that might cause him to lose Coralline forever.

Magnificent and moving, set against a breathtaking ocean landscape, The Oyster Thief is an enthralling fantasy destined to become a classic. (Goodreads.com)

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This is definitely different than my usual reads – but it was such a beautiful story! Faruqi has such a talent for building up such an incredible world through poignant, and fluid writing. Faruqi was able to eloquently create complex characters in a magical, underwater world. I loved reading Coralline and Izar’s adventures  through coral reefs, and Faruqi had such intricate details involved in this underwater world. This book is dreamy, refreshing, and heartening.

Sonia Farqui first made her writing debut with her book, Project Animal Farm. A novel about that the world’s food system inspired by her visit to a dairy farm. She dropped everything she knew, to travel and find solutions to benefit animals, health and environment. Now, Farqui has turned to imagination in her newest book, The Oyster Thief. 

I had the pleasure of having Sonia on RWS to answer a few questions! Check it out below bookies:

Who’s your favourite author?

People are often surprised when I say Ayn Rand. But I find her writing beautiful and I love how she combines purpose and art in her works, particularly Atlas Shrugged. Her life story is also inspiring—she arrived in the U.S. as a poor immigrant from Russia and became among the greatest literary voices of the last century.

Favourite book or genre to read?

I read across genres spanning nonfiction and fiction. Some books that have particularly resonated with me are The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey, and Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling.

When was the moment you realized that you loved literature?

I can’t think of one particular moment, but I’ve loved reading ever since I was a girl. I wrote my first stories when I was nine!

What made you want to be a writer?

I love lots of topics and have lots of interests. Writing is one of those interests, and also a way to explore my other interests through this channel of expression.

What inspired you to write your first book, “Project Animal Farm?”

One night, I arrived at the doorstep of a dairy farm looking for a rural volunteer vacation. I had no idea then that the visit would mark the beginning of a journey that would ultimately wind all the way around the world. Concerned by issues of animal welfare and the environment, I decided to search the planet for solutions. My journey took me from egg warehouses in Canada to dairy feedlots in the United States, from farm offices in Mexico to lush green fields in Belize, from villages in Indonesia to bustling cities in Malaysia.

Over the course of living with farmers, hitchhiking with strangers, and risking my life, I developed surprising insights and solutions—both about the food industry and myself.

What gave you the inspiration for your newest novel, “The Oyster Thief?” Why the change in genres?

The Oyster Thief journey began as organically as the Project Animal Farm journey. I wasn’t planning it. The idea of an underwater world fell into my mind on January 1st, 2015. It was a freezing-cold morning in Canada, and I wished I could escape into tropical waters. But it was too expensive to book a last-minute flight, so I decided to escape in my mind. With a cup of tea in hand, I started inventing an underwater world. 

I found that I really enjoyed disappearing underwater for hours at a time through the novel, and I hope readers do as well!

Did your writing process change at all when you began writing this book, compared to any writing you’ve done before?

I had the impression that nonfiction requires research and planning, and fiction doesn’t. Boy was I wrong about that! After spending about two thousand hours on my manuscript, I decided to throw it all out and start from scratch.

Making the underwater world feel “real” required considerable research, I found. The challenge, however, is that researching the ocean is not like researching things on land. Parts of the ocean are less known to scientists than the moon. And of the millions of species thought to live in the ocean, the majority are unknown to us. To get my bearings underwater and depict the deep blue as accurately as possible, I snorkeled, scuba-dived, swam with sharks, and pored over books and countless articles about the ocean.

All the animals and algae you’ll see mentioned in The Oyster Thief are true-to-life. Even the names of all the characters are scientifically grounded, drawn from the sea and the stars. The Oyster Thief is also current in its themes. For instance, the book contains a premise of underwater diamond mining that was fictional when I started the book but has, just last year, become fact.

Can we expect any more books from you coming up?

There may be a sequel to The Oyster Thief.

Do you have any advice for young writers out there?

Don’t be afraid to take big, bold steps, including starting over. 

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Thank you, Sonia, for coming on RWS to chat with me!

Faruqi’s debut novel The Oyster Thief, will be available in stores OCTOBER 16th 2018!

You can also visit her website: http://www.soniafaruqi.com