MEET THE AUTHOR – B.A Paris

Imagine being in a relationship where the outside is like a fairy tale, but the inside of it is like Hell on Earth. Or witnessing a potential crime and having the power to stop it, but you are slowly losing your memory and your mind…

A test of bravery, courage, and discovery of truth are both tried out in B.A Paris’ novels Behind Closed Doors and The Breakdown

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I first read Behind Closed Doors last year not really knowing anything about B.A Paris. From the first chapter, even the first page, Jack and Grace pulled me into their obscure and somewhat dangerous world. Paris’ writing displayed the trauma Grace was facing, and the inhumane, yet heartbreaking mentality of Jake. This is one of those books that I just could not put down.

It followed a story of a couple – Jake and Grace who seemed to have the perfect relationship, the perfect house, and the perfect life. Was it true love? Then why are there bars on the bedroom window…

Then came The BreakdownCass is driving through a dangerous road in the middle of a storm, and witnesses a car on the side, with a woman in the driver’s seat. The same woman who showed up on the news the next day as a murder victim. Could she really have done anything if she stopped and helped the woman? And what about when Cass begins to forget the little things, like where she placed her keys, or what she had for dinner the night before? And eventually who she actually trusts?

I enjoyed The Breakdown much more than Paris’ previous novel simply because as a reader it felt like I was in the story – feeling the same feelings, and thinking the same thoughts – trying to figure out exactly what was going on. As I was reading through the novel, it really did feel like I, myself, was losing my mind and I couldn’t distinguish what was real and what wasn’t in the book. The writing was enthralling that once again Paris’ created a story that you could not back away from.

These two novels quickly made me a B.A Paris fan and I was a tad disappointed that I had to wait for her newest book to come out – Bring Me Back – set to release March 8th 2018. 

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A novel set around a young British couple who are driving through France on holiday when they stop for gas. He runs in to pay, she stays in the car. When he returns, her car door has been left open, but she’s not inside… no one ever sees her again.
Ten years later he’s engaged to be married; he’s happy, and his past is his past. Until he comes home from work and finds his new wife-to-be is sitting on their sofa. She’s turning something over in her fingers, holding it up to the light. Something that would have no worth to anyone else, something only he and she would know about because his wife is the sister of his missing first love.

Sounds like an engrossing story, right?

I was absolutely ecstatic to be able to ask B.A Paris herself a few questions! Check it out below:

Who’s your favourite author?

I don’t have one, I have many, far too many to list here!

Favourite book or genre to read?

Again, I couldnt possibly choose a favourite. I have lots of favourite books – whenever I’m asked, it often depends on my mood at the time – and I like most genres, except horror and sci-fi.

I first read your book “Behind Closed Doors” about a year ago, and it was a book that I could not put down! Because of the complexity of the characters, and the uncertainty of what is happening plot wise, I was constantly on the edge of my seat (in a good way). What inspired you to write this book?

Some years back, I had a friend and her husband seemed to be very controlling.  I thought it would make a good subject for a book but it turned out much darker than I thought it would.

Where did you get the inspiration for characters like Jack and Grace?

From my imagination! I’m very glad I don’t know anyone like Jack.

Did your writing process change at all when you began writing “The Breakdown”?

My writing process didn’t change as such but it was a very different experience. With Behind Closed Doors I had no expectations of it being published, so I was writing for myself. With The Breakdown, I was writing for all those who had enjoyed behind Closed Doors, so there was a certain pressure to deliver the same kind of reader experience.

In the past you worked in finance and we’re also a teacher – what drew you to become a writer? More specifically, a fiction writer?

I always wanted to write but I thought I would write stories for children. I didn’t think I had it in me to write a novel until one of my daughters persuaded me to try.

Have you set any reading or writing goals for 2018?

Yes, to finish Book 4, which will be another psychological thriller. There are also another couple of writing projects I’ll be working on. My reading goal would be to get through my TBR pile or to read all the Game of Thrones books – but I doubt Ill ever achieve either!

What can we expect from your new novel, “Bring me Back” set to be released next month?

Bring Me Back tells the story of Finn, whose girlfriend disappeared from their car one night and was never found. Twelve years later, Finn begins to receive signs that she may still be alive – and has to confront his past.

Any advice for young aspiring writers out there?

Yes – never, ever give up. And that applies to older aspiring authors too! If I can do it, anyone can.

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Thank you for time B.A Paris – looking forward to your third novel in March!

Until next time bookies,

Sam

 

Meet the Author – Fiona Barton

THE WIDOW                      THE CHILD      

        5/5 STARS                              4/5 STARS       

MY THOUGHTS:

I remember picking up a copy of The Widow on a cold, but sunny December morning last year in Chapters, and reading the synopsis. The story immediately spoke to me and I knew I had to get the book. As I sat down later on that night and indulged into the novel… I.Could.Not.Put.It.Down. Chapter after chapter, page after page, every character was creepier and more interesting. I was so immersed into the world of Jean Taylor, that I completely forgot my own. I loved Barton’s writing, and as I finished the novel, I honestly was craving MORE. Jean Taylor’s husband was fascinating to me – and Jean just as equally intriguing. 

Then, Fiona Barton released The Child in June 2017, and I was ecstatic! I picked up the book right away, and again, sat down and kept on reading – chapter after chapter, page after page. Every character within the novel was interesting, and I honestly had no idea how the story would even end. The way Barton writes allows you to completely immerse yourself into the lives of her characters, and imagine what you would do in their scenarios. Her second novel absolutely did not disappoint, and I am looking forward to reading more of Barton’s writing.

I am a huge fan of thrillers/mysteries, especially with female heroines & protagonists, and Barton’s novels definitely do not disappoint my cravings. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Fiona Barton has definitely become one of my favourite authors. Before writing her first novel, The Widow, Barton was a senior writer at the Daily Mail, and even won Reporter of the Year at the British Press Awards. Her writing flows, and her characters have such depth, and her writing gives you the ability to go inside her characters’ minds.

Luckily, she agreed to do a little Q&A with me!

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THE INTERVIEW:

Who’s your favourite author?

It seems to change from year to year – and sometimes day to day as I discover new writers but constants are authors who take risks to tell stories in new ways. Kate Atkinson and Hilary Mantel are particularly inspirational. Mantel (Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies) for the brilliance and vividness of her story-telling. She broke so many rules – and was criticized by some – but I was in her world from page one; Atkinson (When Will There Be Good News? And Life After Life) for her characters and showing me the power of a story told by many; and John Irving (Cider House Rules and A Prayer for Owen Meany) for his sheer, bonkers, otherness.

Favourite book or genre to read?

Reading is my passion so I read widely and enjoy all kinds of fiction – literary, historical, crime, thrillers, kitchen dramas, short stories, epics, trilogies, romans fleuves – you name it. The book I wish I had written is Wolf Hall.

Has your writing progress changed at all after writing The Widow?

Hugely. I felt huge pressure starting my second book. The success of The Widow meant there were expectations for number two and a deadline from the first word, creating a completely different writing experience. For the first one, no one knew I was writing it so I could let it cook in my head, move sentences around a hundred times and leave it for weeks on end. But Book 2 was a whole other story (in every sense…). What I have learned from both experiences is not to rush to put words on the page – thinking time is as important.

Where do you draw your inspiration from for your novels?

The people on the edge of a story, just out of the spotlight, have been my inspiration. They have a sort of invisibility that I find draws me into their world. I want to know what happens when the press pack leaves and the world stops watching. Because without witnesses or the distraction of the media scrum, masks cannot help but slip.

You were previously a reporter and a news editor. Would you say that being a reporter inspired you to become a writer?

To be honest, I had to unlearn an awful lot when I changed from reporter to fiction writer – you can’t put the whole story in the first paragraph in a thriller! But what I have kept from my journalism is a nose for a good story, and the wonderful cast of characters I amassed during those years.

For 30 years, I was watching and listening to people caught up in dramas, tragedies and conflicts. I squirreled away characters, snippets of conversations, encounters and when I came to write the book, they were all there, ready.

When I read The Widow last year, I was so stunned at the complexity of the characters. As a reader, you’re geared towards hating the husband… but I found Jean Taylor the most perplexing. Where did you get your ideas for this couple?

As a journalist, I spent a lot of time in court. In the big cases, I would find myself watching the wives of those accused of notorious and terrible crimes and wondering what they really knew – or allowed themselves to know. 

I wanted to know how do you cope with the idea that your husband – the man you chose to spend the rest of your life with – may be a monster? Jean and Glen grew out of that fascination and took me on an unexpected journey.

Do you plan on writing another novel any time soon?

I am deep into book 3 now. Watch this space…

Would you like to see either (or both?) of your novels adapted to the big screen?

Both The Widow and The Child have been optioned for television – very excited but not counting my chickens…

Any advice for young aspiring writers out there?

Two pieces of advice stick out: Writing is not just about putting words on a page. Ideas have to cook first. And: hold your nose and write (thank you Hallie Ephron!)

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Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me, Fiona! Looking forward to your next book!

Stay up to date with Barton’s latest project at her website: http://fionabartonauthor.com

Until next time bookies,

Sam